Android’s Best Lightweight Browsers for Rapid Performance

For improved performance on older or less powerful phones, you should switch to a lite Android browser.

Using popular browsers like Chrome, Firefox, or Edge can slow it down if you have an older Android phone. Most of the time, these browsers take up more storage space, processing capabilities, and memory, making it harder for your phone to keep up with your browsing needs.

There are, however, lighter alternatives that are focused on speed and performance and have a much smaller footprint. We’ll show you the best browsers for old Android devices that are light and easy to use.

 

Google Go

Google Go is the only thing that comes close to Google Chrome regarding speed and ease of use. This web browser was built from the ground up for Google’s Android Go phones. It puts speed and efficiency above all else, but it still looks good.

Google Go, which has been downloaded over a billion times, is a good web browser. This app has the unique feature of allowing you to read aloud any text you point the camera at. Several other Google services, like Translate and Lens, are built into the browser, making them easy to use.

Google Go also has a customized feed that learns your preferences over time and provides a constantly updated collection of news, photographs, and the newest trends. You can use most web apps with just one tap, so you don’t have to install separate social media apps on your phone.
Other cool things about the web browser are that you can add a second language while surfing the web, choose your wallpaper, and set up notifications for when web pages are done loading in the background.

 

Via Browser

Chromium WebView is what Via Browser is built on top of. Its main strength is how easy it is to use. The browser doesn’t skimp on any features and gives you a lot of ways to customize it. Every part of the browser puts you in charge, from how it looks and feels to how you use it. According to its speed, Via Browser is among the fastest web browsers for Android.

Via Browser also doesn’t hold back when it comes to making changes. You can change the homepage by changing the picture and style of the background, setting the browser logo to any image you want, and even changing how transparent the background is.

It also has a “private browsing” mode called “Incognito Mode,” or you can set the app to clear your browsing history when you close it. You may also program specific actions to be performed by the navigation buttons when they are long-pressed. For example, you can set the Back button to Scroll to the top and the Forward button to Scroll to the bottom.

Via Browser also has some more advanced features. You can change the browser’s user agent, stop images from loading when using mobile data, save a web page to use when you don’t have Internet access, and more. Via Browser does a great job on old Android devices, even though it only takes up 2MB of space.

 

Orions

Orions, formerly Monument Browser, is a lightweight web browser that runs on top of the Chromium WebView. It is a fast, safe, and easy-to-use web browser that is made to give you the best experience possible while reading and surfing the web. You can change the user agent and switch search engines. You can also move the search bar from top to bottom.

As you surf the web, it gives you some interesting choices. To look at these, tap the Overflow Menu and then Extras. The device also offers a night mode or a reading mode, which lets you change the fonts and even listen to articles while they are on the screen. You can take a screenshot or save the article as a PDF when you are on a page.

The app lets you download audio, video, and even whole web pages to watch later when you’re not connected to the internet. Tap the overflow menu and choose Download Media to open the media inspector. The browser automatically turns on the “picture-in-picture” mode when you watch a video.

Orions is a good choice if you want a browser that is easy to use and focuses on surfing and reading.

 

Phoenix Browser

The WebView part of Phoenix Browser is built on top of Chromium. With the help of the lightweight browser’s integrated download manager, you may download and play web videos without the aid of an additional video player.

But when you first install the app, the homepage will be full of the news based on where you are, games, and the pages you’ve been to the most. Notification ads are also a bit of a problem. In this case, you can turn off all options by going to Manage Homepage. You should also turn off alerts for this app.

Phoenix Browser has more than just the usual features for browsing. It also has some interesting tricks. Tap the hamburger menu, then tap Toolbox to get to them. Turn on Private Space to keep your browsing history and videos you’ve downloaded in their database. No one can see the sites you visit or the videos you download.

In general, this app has both pros and cons. Nevertheless, if you frequently travel and enjoy watching videos while away from home, you should have Phoenix Browser on your device.

 

Hermit

Using the browser Hermit, you may convert regularly visited webpages into lightweight applications. It has a large collection of ready-made lite apps that have already been set up. If you tap an app icon, that app will be installed right away. If you can’t locate a certain lightweight app, Hermit will create it as an app on your home screen if you provide the website’s URL.

When you make a shortcut to a website in Chrome, it works like a new tab. In Hermit’s browser, the lite apps work just like real apps. You can change the settings for each app to make it your own.

For instance, you can set one lite app to run in desktop mode while others can run in mobile mode by default. You can also block images for certain lite apps and choose your themes. Hermit also works with RSS feeds, lets you bookmark a specific part of a site, has a night mode and a reading mode, and does much more.

If you have an old Android device, Hermit can give you more battery life and free up storage space while reducing permission requests from native apps.

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